Ankle Fractures

Video Transcriptions

So I'm here today to talk about ankle fractures, ankle fractures are actually pretty common in the population and usually they are a twisting sort of injury, whether it's stepping down off a curb or playing a sport. Then sometimes they're even higher energy injuries where you're falling off of a ladder or a rooftop or perhaps in a car accident. Ankle fractures affect a good amount of people pretty much daily, and so because of that, that's why I want to discuss them a bit.We generally think about ankle fractures in terms of being stable or unstable ankle fractures. There's a lot of different classifications and grading systems for ankle fractures, but mostly we try to think of them about stable or unstable ankle fractures. Generally speaking, stable ankle fractures can be treated without surgery. They tend to heal on their own and in some instances they need casting, but in other instances they can get away with just being in a boot. Sometimes with certain ankle fractures you can actually weight bear in the boot immediately. It does not require a non weight bearing period.There's another subset of ankle fractures which are the unstable ankle fractures, which tend to involve more than one of the ankle bones sort of being broken, and when I say ankle bones, the ankle is made up of the tailless, the tibia and the fibula. The tibia and the fibula have the bumps that everybody knows about on the inside and the outside of the ankle. Then there's one that's under the Achilles tendon that's sort of the posterior bump or the posterior malleolus.Those three malleoli or those bumps that we talk about are the actual parts of the ankle that can usually get broken. When you have about two or three of those bumps being broken, that is usually what is called an unstable ankle fracture. Those tend to be unstable because it means that the ankle can shift, it can actually dislocate when you have the injury, or sublux where it partially comes out of place.Those because of that injury can actually be higher, have a higher probability of having deep injury as well, meaning a cartilage injury. So those are the ones that tend to require surgery as well. That's where you talk about when you hear people say, "I have metal in my ankle." That's because they have plates and screws, which are usually used to put the pieces back together in the correct alignment. That generally requires about six weeks of no weight on the ankle after it's been fixed. Whereas the stable ankle fractures, if you remember, can sometimes weight bear immediately. So the unstable ankle fractures tend to have a little bit more injury involved. They can damage other tissues, ligaments, cartilage. They also most frequently require surgery and also would require a longer recovery or rehabilitation as well.

Ankle Fractures

Video Transcriptions

So I'm here today to talk about ankle fractures, ankle fractures are actually pretty common in the population and usually they are a twisting sort of injury, whether it's stepping down off a curb or playing a sport. Then sometimes they're even higher energy injuries where you're falling off of a ladder or a rooftop or perhaps in a car accident. Ankle fractures affect a good amount of people pretty much daily, and so because of that, that's why I want to discuss them a bit.We generally think about ankle fractures in terms of being stable or unstable ankle fractures. There's a lot of different classifications and grading systems for ankle fractures, but mostly we try to think of them about stable or unstable ankle fractures. Generally speaking, stable ankle fractures can be treated without surgery. They tend to heal on their own and in some instances they need casting, but in other instances they can get away with just being in a boot. Sometimes with certain ankle fractures you can actually weight bear in the boot immediately. It does not require a non weight bearing period.There's another subset of ankle fractures which are the unstable ankle fractures, which tend to involve more than one of the ankle bones sort of being broken, and when I say ankle bones, the ankle is made up of the tailless, the tibia and the fibula. The tibia and the fibula have the bumps that everybody knows about on the inside and the outside of the ankle. Then there's one that's under the Achilles tendon that's sort of the posterior bump or the posterior malleolus.Those three malleoli or those bumps that we talk about are the actual parts of the ankle that can usually get broken. When you have about two or three of those bumps being broken, that is usually what is called an unstable ankle fracture. Those tend to be unstable because it means that the ankle can shift, it can actually dislocate when you have the injury, or sublux where it partially comes out of place.Those because of that injury can actually be higher, have a higher probability of having deep injury as well, meaning a cartilage injury. So those are the ones that tend to require surgery as well. That's where you talk about when you hear people say, "I have metal in my ankle." That's because they have plates and screws, which are usually used to put the pieces back together in the correct alignment. That generally requires about six weeks of no weight on the ankle after it's been fixed. Whereas the stable ankle fractures, if you remember, can sometimes weight bear immediately. So the unstable ankle fractures tend to have a little bit more injury involved. They can damage other tissues, ligaments, cartilage. They also most frequently require surgery and also would require a longer recovery or rehabilitation as well.